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The weight of a full length coat!


Furrrrrrrrrr
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Hey everyone!

 

I was just thinking about how much I love the weight of a full length fur coat and was wondering what some of the heavier furs are. I have a full length fox that I love, also a full length coyote, but I was surprised to learn how much of a weight difference there is between the two.

 

I’ve noticed my full length raccoon weighs substantially more than my coyote or fox coat.

 

Anybody else like to share their thoughts?

 

I’ve always wanted a lynx coat, but after talking to a couple people it seems that lynx is one of the “lighter” furs out there. Is this true?

 

I’d appreciate any reply’s!

 

-Furrrrr

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Hopefully one day wifey and I can find out!!

 

I had a full legnth rabbit once and it was heavy, but never anything nicer than that.

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An interesting discussion, but there is a factor that many may not be considering here. The weight of a fur garment can be largely influenced by the thickness of the leather of the pelts. As many people are looking for lighter weight furs, tanners frequently flesh (scrape) the leather rather thin. As has been stated in other topics, this shortens the life of the garment as the leather will dry out much faster and disintegrate.

 

Thus trying to directly compare weight by type of fur can be misleading.

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Thanks for the reply’s. You make a great point AKcoyote. I really didn’t think about it that way. Makes me want to see a heavy full length leather coat added into a full length fur, it might feel nice lol

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Thanks for the reply’s. You make a great point AKcoyote. I really didn’t think about it that way. Makes me want to see a heavy full length leather coat added into a full length fur, it might feel nice lol

 

 

I have a custom made full length fox that weighs about 40 lbs. It's fun to wear but not so much when I have to walk around in it. After about an hour or so of walking around downtown Anchorage last week I felt like I had run a marathon. Not to mention how stiff my upper back was after wearing it almost every day.

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Raccoon is often the heaviest of those furs mentioned, followed by certain foxes, than coyote, and lynx is definitely the lightest. Some fox, like red, will be lighter than coyote, whilst blue is nearly always heavier. Feathering, or the insertion of leather strips of varying widths are often used to lighten, and also lower the cost of a fur coat. This is why a blue fox with very wide leathering will be so inexpensive, and also much lighter in weight. I prefer full skin heagvy coatrs but that is quite honestly not as common for most women, as they want warmth with little weight. Hence the styles we so often see today.

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The only truly heavy furs I have are the full length moutons. I'll start to search again thrift shops

 

... when i have money again

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AKCoyote and lynxette are right. Many different factors impact the weight of a fur garment. My go-to weight saving solution is to simply prioritize the thicker longhaired fur on the business end -- the parts of a garment around my face or my hands -- and use fabric on the rest. I've grown to prefer removable accent pieces instead of full fur coats during this decade since purging my collection six or seven years ago.

 

J.

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AKCoyote and lynxette are right. Many different factors impact the weight of a fur garment. My go-to weight saving solution is to simply prioritize the thicker longhaired fur on the business end -- the parts of a garment around my face or my hands -- and use fabric on the rest. I've grown to prefer removable accent pieces instead of full fur coats during this decade since purging my collection six or seven years ago.

 

Then again, I did collect a few more large heavy coats between my travels.

 

J.

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Wow, i think I would die without my fur coats...I would never be able to lose any furs in my collection. I presume it was something you felt you needed to do, but i still feel bad for you nevertheless. I have had to duplicate a couple of coats that were too far gone to repair, but the were exact duplicates so no problem. I would have been really sad if they were gone permanently.

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Does lenght really affect the actuall weight of the coat??

Say a... 7/8s just below knee lenght?? Lighter or heavier or is it the pelts its self?

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Does lenght really affect the actuall weight of the coat??

Say a... 7/8s just below knee lenght?? Lighter or heavier or is it the pelts its self?

The total amount of fur (leather & hair) is usually the main item determining weight of a fur garment. Thus for garments made from substantially similar pelts, a longer garment should usually be heavier.
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Yes, length definitely affects weight, unless the skins are heavily feathered to keep them very light. This generally will cause a decrease in the quality and longevity of the coat however.

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For me, the heavier and thicker the better. I like feeling like I am wearing something, not being naked whilst trying to keep warm. The only exception to this is my beloved lynx, which is both light and very warm

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Yes, red fox, I agree about moutons. Gf can't even wear the full length we have. Older shorter one is better but still very heavy

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Mouton is heavy? I would have never guessed. I haven’t bought one because I thought they would be pretty light! I’ll have to get one. Is beaver heavy?

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Mouton is heavy? I would have never guessed. I haven’t bought one because I thought they would be pretty light!

 

Imagine a leather coat, full skin, without striping nor nothing.

Then, add thick hairs that turns it as almost impermeable.

There you go. The material itself is so heavy that the stitches even struggle to keep it together (even when the overall condition is good, so no hard tossing around folks). But, damn, the heavier the coat the more appealing it is to me, and being a skinny lad I don't exactly mind the weight of it, even because it's way better distributed than, say, the backpack I carry to college.

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It is not course, but it is hardly so soft as sheared beaver. For me it feels like a typical sheepskin, and I am not very fond of them as they are not long haired. Mongolian I like though.

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  • 1 year later...

Living in the UK there aren't that many opportunities to wear fur but I have a couple of coats that I like to use as dressing gowns in the winter.

The weight of a full length fox fur as it bumps against the back of your legs is both warm and sensual. Sadly, my lovely heavy coyote coat (3rd generation, originally from Montreal) had deteriorated and needed to be re-incarnated as a jacket. 

I also have a very heavy ankle length vintage fur, not sure what it is but it has the look of an aquatic animal; it's perfect for star-gazing on a cold, clear winter's night but I wouldn't like to walk far in it. Would love to identify the fur...(first picture has coyote as background). The fur looks as though it's going to be harsh but feels quite soft.  Any thoughts?

1.jpg

2.jpg

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Hi furbull,

I also live in the UK, but I wear fur almost every day, even in this British summer we're having

Just go for it.

Bob

aka Furrybob

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