Jump to content

A change here.


White Fox
 Share

Recommended Posts

Folks, you may notice that we have a new name for this area. The name will in fact change from time to time. I won't tell you what the other names are, but we already have some. And they are really, really neat names. (The name "Off Topic" is probably gone though for good!)

 

Many of you have been to pubs in countries of the world where it is just a great friendly atmosphere. That is what we hope this forum will be. You also know that in these great pubs around the world, certain topics are "avoided" unofficially, and we hope that will take place as well. At the Fur Den members do a terrific job of keeping things on track and that makes our job so much easier.

 

In the Pub almost every topic goes. (but not quite as the description says.)

 

Have fun in the "New Denne Pub".

W

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Theres always a nutter in my local pub and he always comes and sits next to me.

 

Otherwise ; a jolly good idea.

 

May I have a pint of your finest scrumpy jack and a bag of plain crisps opened and a pickled egg placed inside and shaken 7 times please. And a small sherry for the lady please.

 

Anyone else like one while I am at the bar?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TouchofSable,

 

I once went into a pub that is a reknown dive with a girlfriend. A mentally ill (presumably) man aged about seventy sat next to us, called my girlfriend a word beginning with C got up and walked off!

 

A pint of Bass and a cheese and (raw) onion doorstep please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You lot invented XXXX

 

"And this, and other false prophets such as the one they call Fos-ters shall be banished for ever more back to the underworld from whence they sprang; and they shall answer verily come the judgement day"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeppers... we invented XXXX ( a beer from Queensland for the greater unwashed *grin*) which is not to EVER be confused with Fosters.... which by the way has disposed of its European breweries to some European company..... so we may be seeing the last of the major F1 track sponsors go the way of the Dodo... or should that be cigarette WEG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to know, Piotr - Does Fosters really live up to its name? Is it really good enough to be regarded as "Australia's beer?" We have a beer here in Pittsburgh called "Iron City" beer. It's practically as Pittsburgh as the Steelers. In reality, it tastes like somebody pi$$ed in your glass. Not that I've ever tasted pi$$, but - well, you get what I mean . . .

 

Then there's "IC Light" beer. The "light" version of the above. The taste tests are in: Carbonated yellow water . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pivo prossim!!!

 

I may aswell speak czech as I havent a clue what language you guys are speaking...is it Klingon?

 

I'd rather have a kippa tie than a fosters though

 

Now as I have said before, you cant beat a good czech budwar

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's Pittsburghese. A peculiar dialect of American English spoken by folks who live in and around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

 

>>> www.pittsburghese.com <<<

 

Y'Uunz (Also "Yinz"): Pronoun for "you". Virtually the same usage as the Southern US's version of "Y'All". "You All" "You People" "You ones".

 

Ahrn (Also "Arn"): Iron City Beer. A brand of beer brewed in Pittsburgh. (The nickname of Pittsburgh is "The Iron City" because of there are many steel mills there.) Practically the only people who drink it are from Pittsburgh. (Because it is like pee-pee!)

 

Mupp'eres: People from Pittsburgh who travel north to the shores of Lake Erie for weekend vacations. If you ask a person from Pittsburgh where they are from, invariably the answer will be "Mupp'ere from Pittsburgh." (Translation: "I am up here from Pittsburgh.)

 

sousside: The south side of Pittsburgh.

 

'n'at: Contraction of "And that", meaning "And things(places) like that".

 

nibby: To stick your nose into other people's business. To be nosy. The writing end of an old fashioned quill pen is known as the "nib". The nib looks like the beak of a bird. A bird's beak is often compared to a person's nose.

 

walleye: Yellow Pike, Yellow Perch or Pickerel. A kind of fish found in Lake Erie that is popular with sport fishermen from Pittsburgh.

 

>>> Wikipedia Article on Walleye Pike <<<

 

>>> www.walleye.com <<< A site for sport fishing for walleye in Lake Erie.

 

"Them walleye is good eatin' 'n'at." (Walley are good to eat.)

 

Simply put, it is kind of like an American Cockney accent.

 

If I was going to rename this forum in Pittsburghese I'd call it "All'a that udder stuff 'n'at."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL

 

I worked at Penn State University, main campus...out in "pennsyltucky"...for two years, and very, very, quickly learned how to translate Pittsburghese. The place is more Pittsburgh than Philly, and the coolest accents usually come from the older professors who grew up in neighborhoods like East Liberty (anyone ever hear of the Clemente family or Guido Clemente, by any chance?). The dialect almost comes close to Providence...wheah a quatta's still wicked hahd-coah. I learned a bit of Pittsburghese from a girl I dated who was from Etna. My accent's still slippy, but I can still hold my own dahntahn.

 

...way'ta be.

 

 

J.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Worker11811,

 

This is phoenetically a conversation between a driver who is having difficulties in manoeuvering his lorry (truck) and a bystander, in the dialect from my area;

 

these snow was these bin an dunn dus knee?

 

no tell i cause i yaint gotta nigh deal.

 

These bin in gone an gotten where these casn't backen assn't.

 

If any one is interested (as if!), i will translate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

al rate alfurme lad thee will ave to translert, cus ah know a litele bit of thee dialect but still havent a clue what thee are chuffin' talking about me'sen. Ah'll ave pie n peas whilst ah wairt though. Do thy collect spear n jackson shuvels?

 

now war I curm frum me ole luvver we as a gurt ciderrr at the tarvernnn

bout this time arrr we does loyk....afor gettin orf 'ome afore the wife guz down the meccarl fer a spart a bingo. Oh an where the fox 'at?

 

Actually I have just read your post again and it could be west country or northern, depending on the accent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TouchofSable,

 

Bristolian!

 

It roughly translates as:

 

You know what you have done

 

Please tell me as i don't know.

 

You have the lorry in such a position that you are unable to reverse it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes....I thought so when i applied a west country accent i understood it. However if you read it with a yorkshire accent it reads well but without the meaning being clear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a thread recently between FrBrGr and Work with a US English dialect outside Philadelphia. It read so similar, it is funny.

 

I wonder if other languages have these dialect differences?

 

Linda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty certain other languages have their different dialects as well. In high school, I had a Spanish teacher from Spain that told us that some of the spanish dialects are so different from each other, that people from each one would be hard pressed to understand each other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about Mock Sweedish, as in the Sweedish Chef from the old TV show, "Muppet Show"?

 

I'm pretty certeeen oozeer lungooeges hefe-a zeeur deefffferent deeelects es vell. In heegh schuul, I hed a Spuneesh teecher frum Speeen thet tuld us thet sume-a ooff zee spuneesh deeelects ere-a su deefffferent frum iech oozeer, thet peuple-a frum iech oone-a vuoold be-a herd pressed tu understund iech oozeer.

 

Okay... Serious again...

 

I spent some time traveling in Europe. (Belgium/France/Italy) People there told me that my accent/dialect of English was easier for them to understand than people from other places like California and the Southern US. Somebody speaking authentic Pittsburgheese would have totally baffled them!

 

PS: Philadelphia is nearly a 10-hour drive east of where I live. I live 2-3 hours drive due north of Pittsburgh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two interesting stories. True ones.

Recently we were contracted to work in Northern Florida on a job involving talking to probably between 350 and 400 people. We had real problems understanding many of them. However, it is interesting that when we asked them, they mentioned that they did not find we had an accent. Our accent is very close to the so called "TV" accent. The one you find mostly on North American Television. They are so used to that, that our accent did not come through to them. Even though when they speak to each other, their accent is totally different to the point of being hard for us to understand.

 

On another job we stopped one night at a hotel, and we found the woman at the counter had such a pronounced accent (Mid Eastern US) that we could barely understand her. In casual conversation we found that she had moved there when she was young. She was born about 50 miles from where we live! She had taken on that thick accent in that time even though she was not born with it.

 

W

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's another interesting point White. It is indeed possible to take on an accent after having lived somewhere for a while.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An acquaintance of mine live in the USA for about six months and returned with a distinct American accent, After about three months i saw him again and his accent had returned to his original local dialect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...