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Which fox is dyed to make black fox


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There are natural black foxes, but it is a very rare mutation. Generally I believe blue is the most frequently used for dyeing, but I think several varieties of fox can be dyed. Others may have a better answer to the question,

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Thanks AK and Lynxette for the information

I asked as I recently bought an extra large black fox collar and it's really thick and soft so I was curious as to which fox it could have been dyed from .

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One can always tell if a fur is dyed by looking at the skin side...if it is dyed, the skin will be coloured as well of course as part of the process.

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  • 3 months later...

Usually we furriers dye black from blue fox (dense short hair), but we also can and dye anything, depending on the hair length result we want to get. For example we also dye many silver foxes in black with thick underfur and long guard hair.

 

One can always tell if a fur is dyed by looking at the skin side...if it is dyed, the skin will be coloured as well of course as part of the process.

but since there is no natural black fox it is always dyed black at the leather side.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I would like to know to what extent it is possible to dye fox fur WHITE. And what about raccoon fur? I have searched on internet, but it is amazing how little information is available.

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My understanding is that white fox furs start out as white or mostly white. Frequently off-colour foxes are bleached or "brightened" to obtain the desired pure white look.

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True, but what about raccoon? To my knowledge white / off-white raccoons don’t exist, yet white raccoon fur exists so I supppse there has to exist a procedure that to bleach darker shades of fur to white.

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Now I'm beginning to question whether my arctic fox tail really is an arctic fox.

Arctic fox has longer guard hairs which makes it easy to distinguish from blue fox.

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Hi AKCoyote - with respect to Arctic Fox (don't believe I've ever truly seen in person) how can you reliably differentiate it from Shadow Fox in person (beyond pelt size as I believe these are mostly wild and therefore more likely smaller in overall length)?

 

As I understand it Arctic Fox has the highest density of all furs and have always wanted to see it in person.

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magsl,

 

You are correct that arctic fox is generally trapped in the wild while shadow fox is ranch raised. Also correct that shadow fox pelts are generally larger than arctic fox. In fact, I have seen shadow fox pelts that were almost twice as long as arctic fox.

 

In my opinion, the best way to tell arctic fox from shadow fox in a garment is the hair density.

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Quote

 

<>

 

The densest fur in the world is sea otter. The densest fur of any terrestrial mammal is chinchilla.

 

Also, keep in mind that blue fox is a color mutation/phase of Arctic fox.

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Also, keep in mind that blue fox is a color mutation/phase of Arctic fox.
I disagree as blue fox is a separate specie of fox that is ranch raised, whereas arctic fox is wild trapped in the arctic regions.
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They are the same species. In the wild, most Arctic foxes have grayish-blue fur in the summertime, then turn white just before winter and remain white through the winter. A few Arctic foxes have a permanent color mutation which causes them to remain grayish-blue year round. The blue foxes that are raised on fur farms remain blue all year round.

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There are regional differences to Arctic foxes though, aren't there? I know Norwegian blue/arctic fox tends to be more ivory colored while Finnish arctic fox is more of a greyish white. North American Arctic Fox tends to be more closely related to the North American sub-species of the Common Red Fox due to the fact that they often occupy the same region. In most cases, these animals are fiercely territorial and tend to stay far away from each other, but on occasion these animals do mate with one another and over time, new generations of kits will be born with more pure white fur and yet still retain the longer guard hairs and fuller pelts as a recessive trait thanks to their common red fox ancestry.

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