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Fur Cleaning...


imax-7
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I know this question was asked before in the old forum, but I can't remember the answer (if there was one). And it probably has been asked here but I don't remember and am too lazy to look .

For those who have their furs cleaned regularly, what is the average (usual) cost of each cleaning. I realize that different regions will be priced different. I have contacted a few furriers in the past about cleaning and the answer I usually got was, they either didn't offer cleaning services or I received no response (a real big help ). Also can you have real fur cleaned at a 'dry cleaners', I was told this by a furrier in the past. I know you can have faux fur cleaned this way, but I don't think I received the right info on real fur.

Any help would be appreciated Thnx

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last year i had a number of things stored and a few cleaned. coats were about $35 a piece to clean and glaze, but i think the furrier gives me a deal, as i bring so much in. i've seen sites advertise cleaning for about $50, but couldn't tell you which furriers those were off hand. i use robert scott furs, what used to be leakas, in worthington (columbus suburb), oh. hope that helps.

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imax,

 

This is actually a very complicated question. Because there are many methods of cleaning and many different requirements based on the kind of fur it is. Like sheared mink, Persian lamb, Fox and so on.

 

Cleaning a fur, if it very old has to be done by hand. Also blankets.

 

Furriers do not make their money cleaning the furs. They know that most furs need about $200 in repairs + when you bring them in for cleaning. It is just a part of normal fur maintenance. And, they LOVE remodels.

 

Every two years you should take a fur and have it cleaned and glazed. UNTIL it is not worth the cost to maintain.

 

So, for the great ebay buys we can find. Don't waste your money unless it is really a favorite. If a spot gets soiled wipe gently with a damp cloth with the fur and don't let pelts get wet. Don't rub. Then air dry.

 

Remember if this is a toy: Keep it until it is time to replace it. Think of it as disposable not a capital investment.

 

On storage at your home: Keep in the coolest area of your house, Don't cover in Plastic, Protect from light. Make certain it is not packed in tight. It needs to breath.

 

Your fur is hurt my humidity, light, heat, insects and pests.

 

If you have a huge wine cellar that has climate control that is perfect!!

 

Also, mice just love to make nesting out of fur in the Fall.

 

Hope this helped. May have just raised more questions than it answered.

 

Linda

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imax,

 

I ask the MOD of this forum to move this to the Main Forum, because this question is of interest to several of the members. In off topic many could have missed it.

 

Thanks!

 

Linda

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Okay, I've been wanting to ask this for a while now: what are the specs on proper climate controls for home fur storage? I'd like to know what temperature and humidity levels need to be maintained? It cost a bomb to clean and store my items last season, but more than that I'd really rather not be without them (to have to shoot with and for play). Is it feasible to set up a small room with, let's say, a portable air conditioner/dehumidifier, if the house already has central ac? I have to think the cost of cooling the room, as far as energy consumption goes, would have to be cheaper in the long run. Any thoughts are appreciated.

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We keep ours in summer in a bedroom which has the curtains drawn and so its cold even in summer.

 

So even when its 30 degrees outside then its only 14 degrees max inside.

But we have a brick house and the back doesnt see sunlight much.

 

Attics are the worst mistake.......they can get very hot.

 

Basements can be damp, and keep them away from cold damp walls. Mildew can result.

 

NEVER keep furs near a radiator. In fact get rid of central heating altogether...its bad for fur and the environment. And if you are cold PUT YOUR FUR ON !!!!!

 

I fur gets wet give it a few gentle shakes...like a dog its soon dry.

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I know of one fur vault that is 35 degrees and I believe it is 50% humidity and of course dark.

 

But, I had an expert tell me that when you cool the vault that low it makes the furs smell like a refigerator.

 

But, as I have mentioned. They are many furriers who take the coats and put them in a backroom or their basements with no special humidity controls or cooling.

 

Also, many times they jam them so tight there is no way they can breath.

 

If you have a nice piece, I still would spend the money and do business with a quality furrier. Don't decide based upon price.

 

The theory in getting the temp below where insects can live or mold cn grow. Also, keeps the pelts from drying out when combined with cleaning and glazing.

 

This is my question: How can anything be more drying than Winter and furnace heat?

 

Linda

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Cleaning, glazing and storage is $90.00 in the Portland, OR area for a sheared beaver coat. I think storage by itself is $35-$40.

 

NEVER, EVER dryclean a fur! It will ruin your fur. My furrier has told me about the number of people that bring him their furs after they had them drycleaned. They MIGHT be able to take drycleaning once, but the 2nd time around the damage is permanent and their is nothing he (or any other furrier) can do to repair them.

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Here in FL, cleaning and storage runs about $110 (Thanks, ReFur!). Repairs, of course, are extra and can range from $50 and up.

 

Based on what everyone has said, I don't feel so bad about keeping my furs in the 2nd bedroom closet at 77F maximum.

 

FLinFL

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FLinFL,

 

Closets are usually 10 degrees warmer than the house if the door is shut.

 

I would also be concerned about humidity issues in Florida.

 

If you lived in Minnesota, would not be a problem.

 

Some furriers will require you to have fur both cleaned and stored if they are going to take it. But, check. If you can just have it stored and not cleaned or repaired it might be worth it to you living there.

 

And, Fur Princess is absolutely correct! I had forgot to address this. Don't ever let a dry cleaner touch a fur or leather. And, even the storage have them show you their fur vault. Or, most likely it will be stuck in their basement or backroom.

 

Linda

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Some other things to consider. Some furriers do not store furs at their salon. They send them out to a commercial storage facility. They usually do not have the space to store furs.

 

Another item is insurance for your furs while they are in storage. Insurance for your furs is provided by your homeowners policy. Check to see if your insurance is in effect when your furs are in storage. Insurance by the furrier is usually not included in the storage fee. Your furrier is able to provide it, but it is an extra fee above the storage fee.

 

My recommendation is to take your fur to the furrier for storage. If he is familiar with your furs, he can also do some preventative maintainance for your furs. He can spot a potential area of damage before it becomes a major problem and correct it at a lower cost than doing a major repair job.

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Fur storage at Flemington Furs is $34.50

 

Safurize cleaning is $44.50

 

"Sa-Furize Cleansing:

 

Deep cleansing is a very important aspect of regular fur maintenance. When it comes to keeping your fur as lovely as it possibly can be, nothing beats our exclusive "Sa-Furize" cleansing process. Each hair is gently cleaned to restore and revitalize its natural beauty. You'll be so impressed with the softness, appearance and clean smell of your garment after this very special process has been applied."

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Hi Linda,

 

I always make sure that my closets are kept open - even if it's just a little to let air circulate. Also, the problem here is lack of humidity - the a/c is on pretty constantly from April to November, so I see that drying is a big problem. Anyhow, I think 'my better furs' are off to a well deserved summer vacation.

 

FLinFL

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Okay, I've been wanting to ask this for a while now: what are the specs on proper climate controls for home fur storage? I'd like to know what temperature and humidity levels need to be maintained? It cost a bomb to clean and store my items last season, but more than that I'd really rather not be without them (to have to shoot with and for play). Is it feasible to set up a small room with, let's say, a portable air conditioner/dehumidifier, if the house already has central ac? I have to think the cost of cooling the room, as far as energy consumption goes, would have to be cheaper in the long run. Any thoughts are appreciated.

 

Hi Miss T,

I'm no expert on this but I would perhaps suggest that using a/c or dehumidifier would lead to drying out of the pelts as all the mositure would be sucked out of any small room or closet, if the areas large it may be ok BUT......? I've kept my furs at home & leave them hanging so there aired but kept out of direct sunlight & away from any heat source. In summer I keep them in a shaded room again hanging so they get plenty of air flow & to date have had no problems with drying out, would recommend getting them glazed/cleaned only every 2nd or 3rd year but that really would depend on the wear n tear factor

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If you are worried about too much humidity vs drying. The target is 50%. It will depend where you live and how cool you keep your home. Where I live the humidity never drops below 50% with air on.

 

Linda

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A number of those involved in the business have stressed to me how important it is to clean a coat every year. But many have stressed more on how hard it is on them and that they prefer to not clean them if possible. The more I get to know about the process, the more I realize that the latter is probably more the case.

 

In fact people involved in the business have described another process that is often used to clean coats that are just too old to take the cleaning process. I would not though want to describe it myself as I don't remember it that well.

 

W

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That is the rule of thumb. I would love to make a very long post here right now. But, I have exceeded my limit to be on the Den. I will check back in on this topic a little later.

 

Linda

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  • 3 weeks later...

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