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Variation on a theme.


Mr Barguzin
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Started going through various days at "Any-Day-In-History" and thought of an interesting variation, rather than birthdays.

 

Given the following events, what is the date?

 

births

1826 Stephen Foster Lawrencevil, Pa, composer (Oh! Susanna, Swanee River)

1878 George M Cohan entertainer, Give my regards to Broadway

1900 Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong New Orleans LA, jazz musician (Hello Dolly)

1927 Gina Lollobrigida Subiaco Italy, actress (Trapeze, Falcon Crest)

1946 Michael Milken LA Calif, partner (Intl Capital Access Group)

1963 Henri Leconte France, tennis player (French finalist 1988)

 

deaths

1848 Francois Rene de Chateaubriand French novelist/politician, dies

1938 Suzanne Lenglen 6 time Wimbeldon champ, dies at 39 of anemia

 

 

On this day:

1817 Construction on Erie Canal begins

1865 1st edition of "Alice in Wonderland" is published

1969 "Give Peace a Chance" by Plastic Ono Band is released in the UK

1969 140,000 attend Atlanta Pop Festival featuring Led Zep & Janis Joplin

1969 Ann Jones defeats Billie Jean King for Wimbeldon Ladies championship

1987 Martina Navratilova wins 6th straight Wimbeldon defeats Steffi Graf

1987 Nazi Klaus Barbie, "Butcher of Lyon" convicted by a French court

1988 Steffan Edberg beats Boris Becker for Wimbeldon crown

 

 

It would be nice if someone guessed it, so please give reasons *grin*

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Day Number TWO.

 

On this day the following folks were born:

 

1214 Louis IX king of France (1226-70)

1599 Oliver Cromwell Puritan lord protector of England (1653-58)

1710 James Ferguson astronomer

1908 Edward R Murrow Pole Creek NC, newscaster (Person to Person)

1947 Johan Cruyff Dutch soccer player/coach (Ajax/Barcelona)

1953 Gary Cosier cricketer (Australian batsman 1975-78, 109 on debut vs West Indies)

1957 Eric "The Crafty Cockney" Bristow London England, dart thrower (5 World Masters titles)

 

Died

 

1792 Nicolas J Pelletier Frenchman, first to be guillotined

1915 Nicola d' Arienzo composer, dies at 72

 

On this Day

1185 Sea battle at Dan-no-ura Minamoto Yoritomo beats Taira-family

1449 Anti-pope Felix V resigns

1507 Geographer Martin Waldseemuller 1st used name America

1541 Liege flooded after heavy down pour

1678 French troops conquer Ypres

1684 Patent granted for the thimble

1719 Daniel Defoes publishes "Robinson Crusoe"

1886 Sigmund Freud opens practice at Rathausstrasse 7, Vienna

1898 US declares war on Spain over Cuba

1905 Whites win right to vote in South Africa

1945 46 countries convene United Nations Conference on International Organization in San Francisco CA

1956 Elvis Presley's "Heartbreak Hotel" goes #1

1959 St Lawrence Seaway linking Atlantic, Great Lakes opens to shipping

1962 US resumes above ground nuclear testing, at Christmas Island

1971 About 200,000 anti-Vietnam War protesters march on Washington DC

1971 USSR performs nuclear test at Eastern Kazakhstan/Semipalitinsk USSR

1979 Peace treaty between Israel & Egypt goes into effect

1990 Hubble space telescope is placed into orbit by shuttle Discovery

1993 Russia elects Boris Yeltsin leader

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Started going through various days at "Any-Day-In-History" and thought of an interesting variation, rather than birthdays.

 

Given the following events, what is the date?

 

births

1826 Stephen Foster Lawrencevil, Pa, composer (Oh! Susanna, Swanee River)

1878 George M Cohan entertainer, Give my regards to Broadway

1900 Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong New Orleans LA, jazz musician (Hello Dolly)

1927 Gina Lollobrigida Subiaco Italy, actress (Trapeze, Falcon Crest)

1946 Michael Milken LA Calif, partner (Intl Capital Access Group)

1963 Henri Leconte France, tennis player (French finalist 1988)

 

deaths

1848 Francois Rene de Chateaubriand French novelist/politician, dies

1938 Suzanne Lenglen 6 time Wimbeldon champ, dies at 39 of anemia

 

 

On this day:

1817 Construction on Erie Canal begins

1865 1st edition of "Alice in Wonderland" is published

1969 "Give Peace a Chance" by Plastic Ono Band is released in the UK

1969 140,000 attend Atlanta Pop Festival featuring Led Zep & Janis Joplin

1969 Ann Jones defeats Billie Jean King for Wimbeldon Ladies championship

1987 Martina Navratilova wins 6th straight Wimbeldon defeats Steffi Graf

1987 ***[info] Klaus Barbie, "Butcher of Lyon" convicted by a French court

1988 Steffan Edberg beats Boris Becker for Wimbeldon crown

 

 

It would be nice if someone guessed it, so please give reasons *grin*

 

First week in July on a Sunday - Edberg winning Wimbledon is the big clue

So for 1988 that would be, adjusts window clock, 3rd July???

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First week in July on a Sunday - Edberg winning Wimbledon is the big clue

So for 1988 that would be, adjusts window clock, 3rd July???

furelli, thanks for the hint.

That made it almost too easy - my research indicates July 04 is the date in question.

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First week in July on a Sunday - Edberg winning Wimbledon is the big clue

So for 1988 that would be, adjusts window clock, 3rd July???

furelli, thanks for the hint.

That made it almost too easy - my research indicates July 04 is the date in question.

 

Nah! Not the ol' It was raining finals day & play it on the Monday trick!!!! seeing as Martina's final was on a Sat in 1987!!!!! Them pesky leap years!

 

That's 2 I've been done on now, counting "Lady & the Tramp" Grrrrr

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Gee am I dissappointed or what?... Tennis gave the clue?? I'd have thought that the birthdays of Satchmo, Steven Foster and George M Cohen (Yankee Doodle Dandy) would have been the give aways.

 

Ah well, at least a Yank *grin* Git it right first go *grin*

 

It is Indeed July 4th, aka Independence Day.

 

(WEG Now I know which clues NOT to include LOL)

 

Any takers for Numer 2??

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Mr B,

I know the answer for number 2, but not why you chose that date.

 

I am waiting to see if anybody else can figure it out via Google search or other means. I will say I had to research two of the events as the first led to several incorrect dates.

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AH give us the date and the reason You think I chose it *grin*

 

and here's another for you... just fur fun.

 

Born

1855 Arnold Ludwig Mendelssohn composer

1891 Henry Miller author (Tropic of Capricorn, Tropic of Cancer, Sexus)

1901 Georgy Mikhaylovich Rimsky-Korsakov composer

1917 Rosemary Woods Nixon's secretary, keep her away from your tapes

1939 [Harvey] Phil Spector record producer (Wall of Sound)

1961 Tahnee Welch [La Tahn Renee Welch] San Diego CA, actress (Cocoon)

 

Died

1862 38 Santee Sioux Indians hanged in Mankato

1963 "Gorgeous George" Wagner wrestler, dies

1972 Harry Truman 33rd US President dies in Kansas City MO at 88

1973 Harold B Lee US head of Mormon Church, dies at 74

1974 Jack Benny comedian (Jack Benny Show), dies at 80

1977 Howard Hawks director (Rio Lobo, Hatari!), dies at 81

 

And In This Day

0268 St Dionysius ends his reign as Catholic Pope

0418 St Zosimus ends his reign as Catholic Pope

0795 St Leo III begins his reign as Catholic Pope

1620 Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth MA

1825 Erie Canal opens

1830 Gaetano Donizetti's opera "Anna Bolena" premieres in Milan

1831 Vincenzo Bellini's opera "Norma" premieres in Milan

1877 Socialist Labor Party of North America holds 1st national convention

1918 1st day of 1st-class cricket in Australia after WWI (Victoria vs New South Wales)

1924 Judy Garland, age 2

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*bunting and confetti fall from the ceiling as the fireworks explode outside*

*picking self offa the ground*

 

Good Grief... Furelli got it RIGHT... on his second attempt (as in ANZAC Day, April 25th..... Aussies Version of Independence day and Memorial Day rolled into one LOL)

 

Was that your estimate AK??

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Okay this should be easy as it was the most important event of the year 1990, and in my humble opinion the most important event in history on that date, so I will only list that as everything else pales into insignificance:

 

1990: Nortons Coin wins the gold cup at 100/1

 

trained by a sheep farmer in west wales who only had two horses he used to round up his herd. national velvet stuff; especially when you "are on" at that price

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AK

 

The following is the reason for the name ANZAC Day and the historical basis behind it.

 

Sydney Morning Herald

May 8, 1915

By Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett

 

It required splendid skill, organisation, and leadership to get the huge armada under way from Mudros Bay, on the south of Lemnos Island, in the Aegean Sea, without accident. The warships and transports were divided into five divisions.

 

Never before had an attempt been made to land so large a force in the face of a well-prepared enemy. At 2 o'clock in the afternoon of April 24 the flagship of the division, conveying the Australians and New Zealanders, passed down the long line of slowly moving transports, amid tremendous cheering, and was played out of Mudros Bay by French warships. At 4 o'clock the ship's company and the troops assembled to hear Admiral de Roebeck's proclamation to the combined forces.

 

This was followed by the last service before battle, in which the chaplain uttered the prayer for victory and called the Divine blessing on the expedition. All stood with uncovered and bowed heads.

 

At dusk the bugle sounded for "all lights out", and the troops rested for the ordeal that they were to undergo at dawn next day.

 

It was a beautiful calm night, with a bright half-moon shining.

 

By 1 o'clock in the morning the ships had reached the rendezvous, five miles from the appointed landing place, and the soldiers were aroused and served with the last hot meal.

 

The Australians, who were about to go into action for the first time in trying circumstances, were cheerful, quiet, and confident. There was no sign of nerves nor of excitement.

 

As the moon waned, the boats were swung out, the Australians received their last instructions, and the men who six months ago had been living peaceful civilian lives had begun to disembark on a strange and unknown shore in a strange land to attack an enemy of a different race.

 

Every eye was fixed on the grim line of hills in the front, menacing in the gloom, and the mysteries of which those in the boats were about to solve.

 

Not a sound was heard, and when a light was seen it appeared as if the enemy had been surprised. In our nervy state the stars were often mistaken for lights ashore.

 

The progress of the boats was slow, and dawn was rapidly breaking.

 

At 10 minutes to 4 o'clock the enemy showed an alarm light, which flashed for ten 10 minutes, and then disappeared.

 

Our boats appeared almost as one on the beach, and seven torpedo-boat destroyers glided noiselessly inshore, and at seven minutes to 4 o'clock came a sharp burst of rifle-fire from the beach. The sound relieved the prolonged suspense, which had become almost intolerable.

 

The Australians rose to the occasion. Not waiting for orders, or for the boats to reach the beach, they sprang into the sea, and, forming a sort of rough line, rushed at the enemy's trenches.

 

Their magazines were not charged, so they just went with cold steel.

 

It was over in a minute. The Turks in the first trench were either bayonetted or they ran away, and their Maxim was captured.

 

Then the Australians found themselves facing an almost perpendicular cliff of loose sandstone, covered with thick shrubbery. half-way up, the enemy had a second trench, strongly held, from which they poured a terrible fire on the troops below and the boats pulling back to the destroyers for the second landing party.

 

Here was a tough proposition to tackle in the darkness, but those colonials, practical above all else, went about it in a practical way. They stopped for a few minutes to pull themselves together, got rid of their packs, and charged their magazines.

 

Then this race of athletes proceeded to scale the cliffs without responding to the enemy's fire. They lost some men, but did not worry.

 

In less than a quarter of an hour the Turks were out of their second position, either bayonetted or fleeing.

 

There has been no finer feat in this war than this sudden landing in the dark and storming the the heights, above all holding on whilst the reinforcements were landing ...

 

A serious problem was getting to the wounded from the shore. All those unable to hobble had to be carried from the hills on stretchers, and then their wounds hastily dressed and the men carried to the boats.

 

The courage displayed by these wounded Australians will never be forgotten.

 

Though many were shot to bits, without the hope of recovery, their cheers resounded throughout the night. You could see in the midst of the mass of suffering humanity arms waving to the crews of the warships.

 

They were happy because they had been used for the first time and had not been found

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