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a_man_of_many_foxes

Am thinking of getting a lynx coat

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lynxette

First of all, one must define terms.  Lynx strictly speaking, only refers to Canadian or Russian lynx.  Creamy white in colour, very long guard hairs, subtle spotting.  This is much softer and even thicker than any fox, but it is a completely different species of course and so not for everyone.  Also remember, the softer the fur, the more delicate it is generally speaking.  The bold coloured, shorter guard hair variety often pictured and called lynx is really bobcat and not lynx at all.  In the industry it is also called cat lynx.  Definitely not so long of guard hairs, yet soft and very nice in it's own way.  In a way, think of it like wolf versus coyote kind of.  Both canines, but very different in other aspects.  All furs are enjoyable to different people in different ways though.  My preference is for true lynx, as heavy, soft and thick furs are best in my view, but I own both types discussed above.

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Tu_che_le_vanità
9 hours ago, lynxette said:

First of all, one must define terms.  Lynx strictly speaking, only refers to Canadian or Russian lynx.  Creamy white in colour, very long guard hairs, subtle spotting.  This is much softer and even thicker than any fox, but it is a completely different species of course and so not for everyone.  Also remember, the softer the fur, the more delicate it is generally speaking.  The bold coloured, shorter guard hair variety often pictured and called lynx is really bobcat and not lynx at all.  In the industry it is also called cat lynx.  Definitely not so long of guard hairs, yet soft and very nice in its own way.  In a way, think of it like wolf versus coyote kind of.  Both canines, but very different in other aspects.  All furs are enjoyable to different people in different ways though.  My preference is for true lynx, as heavy, soft and thick furs are best in my view, but I own both types discussed above.

Scientifically speaking, there are four species of lynx/four species in the Lynx genus. The Iberian lynx, Eurasian lynx, Canadian lynx, and bobcat (only the last three are used in the fur trade as the first is listed as endangered and has rather short, flat fur). Technically speaking, the bobcat is a type of lynx. However, it is quite distinct from the other three. For one thing, it has a special looking tail (look at the tip and then compare that tip with the tip of the tail of the other three species). The fur trade confuses things by calling bobcat various names such as cat lynx, lynx cat, American lynx, and Montana lynx, the last name of which refers to bobcats from western North America (Rocky Mountains and west of those mountains).

Bobcats vary tremendously in their fur quality. Some have spots, rosettes, spots and rosettes, while others have plain fur. The length of fur and density also vary. The color is a huge variable. Generally speaking, the bobcats with the worst fur come from the Southeast, from such places like Alabama and Florida. These cats have very flat, thin fur. The best pelts come from the high elevations of the American West plus western Canada. These cats have very thick, very soft fur. Bobcat fur should have as little brown as possible. High quality bobcats come in yellow, gray, orange, pinkish beige. In my opinion, the western bobcats have the most beautiful fur of any species in the Lynx genus. The belly is the most valuable part of the pelt. The whiter the belly, the more valuable the pelt. The white part should also be as wide as possible.  Some bobcats have light orange colored belly fur. These are usually nursing females. You can feel the belly and see if you can touch the dried up teats. As an added note, Texas produces some of the most gorgeous of the spotted bobcats

Eurasian lynx is known as Russian lynx in the fur industry as practically all Eurasian lynx pelts come from Russia. The Eurasian lynx varies tremendously in its fur quality. Some have distinct black spots all over the body while others have no spots on the back. Some have really long, thick fur while others have distinctively shorter fur. The color also varies quite a bit, with some being pale silvery in color while others are more gray and others are more orange and others are pinkish beige. The belly is usually pale white (not the bright white of the belly of the bobcat) and the black spots tend to be subtle in color. The top part of the back legs tend to have really small, dark black spots.

The Canadian lynx has the most easily identifiable fur of the three species that are used in the fur industry. Its fur also varies but not so much as the bobcat and the Eurasian lynx. With Canadian lynx, the color should be as pale and silvery as possible. Yellowish pelts and brownish pelts are not desirable. The belly fur tends to be the least white of three species that are used in the fur industry. The belly fur has really subtle spots and the back fur usually has zero spots of any kind. In my opinion, Canadian lynx fur is not attractive. It has not caught on in the Russian fur market as the Russians have their own type of lynx with superior fur. It has also not caught on in the Chinese fur market.

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racerx
On 11/27/2018 at 10:23 PM, paul2809 said:

I recomend talking to Lynxette here on the forums......

I understand that she knows alot of info on lynx fur.........

personally ive touched lynx furs and its just truely a Gorgeous fur...........

id buy one if I had the money and I could get one in a 2x to 3x plus size full lenght lynx fur coat

I agree with you Paul, lynx furs are gorgeous.

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